You came this way: Home > cheyenne_h > Blog

cheyenne_h (FMA Admin)

Mini Profile

REGISTERED:10/01/2014
COMMENTS POSTED:98
MIXES CREATED:24
AFFILIATIONS:---

cheyenne_h's Blog

cheyenne_h on 05/25/2017 at 02:50PM

NewsFLASH

If anyone is having trouble uploading (established FMA artists, folks entering recipes to the Audio Cookbook, what-have-you), please make sure Flash is enabled. We are working on getting this removed from the uploader to make it easier on everyone, but for now please bear with us. 

Thank you!

» 0 COMMENTS Share
cheyenne_h on 05/22/2017 at 06:15AM

A Music Information Retrieval Dataset, Made With FMA

You may recall some news we shared last summer about a music dataset that was in progress - now it's complete!

Michaël Defferrard, Kirell Benzi, Pierre Vandergheynst & Xavier Bresson, a team of researchers interested in MIR (music information retrieval), have put together some audio datasets using the FMA's collection! They have written a paper about the FMA's potential as a viable and legal option in digital audio research. Since recorded music is often fraught with copyright concerns, machine learning sets for music have been hard to find, or not sufficient for some projects. You can find the datasets on GitHub.

The FMA's dedication to the Creative Commons philosophy of sharing has been a boon for artists, educators, and researchers - as well as, of course, listeners! Hopefully this dataset will be widely adopted for use by MIR researchers. It seems to have already been well-received via Twitter:

 

First announcement from @m_deff on Twitter 

Sander Dieleman expresses thanks for the team's hard work.

Fellow researcher Xavier Bresson proposes deep learning research for music

A great big THANKS go to this team for thinking of FMA and sharing our collection with a new audience, for a new purpose, in a new way! We look forward to the cool projects that will stem from their efforts.

» 0 COMMENTS Share
cheyenne_h on 05/21/2017 at 04:26PM

Audio Cookbook Rules & Guidelines

"At The Lunchtime Wedding Banquet" by WL on Flickr. CC BY-NC-SA.

FUN FACT:

Recipes are not subject to copyright! (Yep, it's true.)

But there are just not enough songs about recipes, or containing recipes, to satisfy us. We want you to help make our songs-about-food dreams come true!

Do you have a favorite recipe (or five) you'd like to share with the world? We have just the opportunity: the FMA's Audio Cookbook! It'll be an audio compendium of recipes, all free and dedicated to the Public Domain using the CC0 Public Domain Dedication tool, so anyone can use the recipes however they'd like.

So, here's how it'll work:

  1. Choose a recipe you want to share. (If it's from a cookbook that's still protected by copyright, it's OK to share the ingredients and the directions - but any commentary or descriptive wording should be your own. Don't plagiarize, or you'll get disqualified.) Don't have a recipe in mind? Check out our resource page for inspiration!
  2. Compose a song or make a recording containing the recipe. Songs must contain a recipe to be eligible for the Audio Cookbook. Recipes must be for food or drinks; recipes for home cleaning products, for example, are not eligible. Questions? Email us at contact [at] freemusicarchive [dot] org.
  3. Submit it on the Audio Cookbook album page (along with your FMA username, the name of the band/artist, song title, and please include the text of the recipe from which your recording was derived - or a link to the place where you found it). You must have an FMA account to submit a song; if you don't have one, sign up for free here. Songs are reviewed before they are 'published' so if you notice yours doesn't pop up within a day or two, let us know.
  4. Rinse and repeat as many times as you like!

Make sure your song is original - singing a recipe to a traditional (read: public domain) tune is fine, but putting your words to a current song that's protected by copyright can get us into hot water! Please don't do it.

We will accept entries from Wednesday, May 24 2017 until Friday, June 30 2017. One lucky artist or band will be selected as the reigning Audio Cookbook champion, and they will win a prize for their efforts!

Want to record yourself givng instructions for how to make a favorite appetizer, entree, dessert or drink, maybe with some musical accompaniment? Do it!
Want to get arty and record the sounds of veggies being chopped up, or something sizzling in a pan, with narration? Sounds tasty!
Want to write a ditty with the recipe of your choice as the lyrics for the song? We want to hear it!
Want to liven up your Aunt Gertrude's recipe for zucchini bread with some harmonica and throat-singing? We strongly encourage you to do so!
Is your favorite recipe a surrealist series of instructions that results in a three-foot-tall sandwich that nobody could eat? Well, okay, that's cool too!

However, we gotta draw the line somewhere. If it doesn't contain a recipe for SOMETHING (theoretically) edible or drinkable, we won't share it. Rules is rules, and we don't want anyone poisoning themselves with your ah-mazing idea for kitty litter ice cream. Save it for another contest.

» 4 COMMENTS Share
TAGGED AS:
audio cookbook
cheyenne_h on 05/10/2017 at 06:14PM

Audio Cookbook Inspiration and Resources

Can't decide which recipe to sing about - or are you in search of unique recipes to add to our Audio Cookbook

Here are a few of our favorite places to look for public domain recipes - have a look:

NYPL's small but excellent collection of public domain books, available to read online
Project Gutenberg's "Cookery" collection
, for view online, organized by country, type of dish, and more
An online compendium of Medieval recipes, for view online
ICSA's Public Domain cookbook archive, more than 500 available as PDF downloads
Boston Public Library collection of cookbooks on archive.org, available to read online
Archive.org's massive cookbook collection from sources like UCLA Special Collections, The Bancroft Library at The University of California, Berkeley, and the Prelinger Archive

 

Hungry for more? There are more recipes and links over at the Open Source Cook blog!

» 0 COMMENTS Share
TAGGED AS:
audio cookbook
cheyenne_h on 05/09/2017 at 09:59AM

FMA + GTDR = Listening Party!

Dancin' with the Stars - literally. Image donated by a kindly artist-friend.

We are SO EXCITED to tell you about our newest project - the FMA Listening Party! A weekly, one-hour program that will bring selections from the FMA to your ears (and eyes, if you choose to join us for the weekly playlist and chat).

The show will consist completely of music from the FMA (with an occasional chat with a guest or co-host), hosted by FMA Director Cheyenne. We teamed up with Give The Drummer Radio (or GTDR, a WFMU-affiliated webstream) and have a place in their weekly schedule: from 3-4pm (Eastern) on Tuesdays. Huge thanks to Doug and the Stream Team for making it possible, and welcoming us into their family of dedicated, incredible DJs!

We'll also share the playlists weekly, so you can download everything in one easy place, if you enjoyed the show. We hope you'll join us today for our very first Listening Party, right here.

» 1 COMMENTS Share
TAGGED AS:
fma listening party
cheyenne_h on 04/25/2017 at 06:58PM

State Of The Commons: 2017 Annual Report

Screenshot from the Report's website; CC BY, Creative Commons 2017.

The commons is the largest collection of free and open knowledge in the world, and the Free Music Archive is proud to be part of it! To get some idea of how vast this amoeba of media, tools, and knowledge is, you should take a look at a report that was just released: the State of the Commons Report!

The numbers are in, and according to Creative Commons, there are more than 1.2 BILLION works shared with CC licenses floating around the web now. 65% of these works are shared under "Free Culture" licenses, which are CC BY, CC BY-SA, and CC0 (as well as other Public Domain tools). All CC licenses grant anyone who encounters a work certain permissions; "Free Culture" licenses are the most permissive and open, allowing for remixing, use in audiovisual projects, and more. The other licenses, which still allow for various types of use and access that standard copyright does not, make up the remaining 35% of the commons.

All of the licenses (aside from public domain tools) are built with cooperation and citation in mind, so if you use CC material, please follow the licenses and be excellent to each other (by giving attribution, for starters - here's an easy example).

Some notable additions this year are the NY Metropolitan Museum of Art, which added 375,000 works to the public domain using CC0; The Global African Storybook Project, which crowdsources translations of children's stories in languages not often considered by publishers to broaden access and encourage literacy; The British Museum, which released 128 models to Sketchfab; and our very own Freeharmonic Orchestra got a shout-out in the highlights section!

Other sources for CC audio listed in the report include Jamendo and Wikimedia Commons, but there is also a wealth of CC-licensed music in the Internet Archive and lots of free, re-usable sounds over at freesound.org.

Do you have other favorite spots to look for audio in the Commons? Comment below! And don't forget to read, excerpt, share, and tweet the report at http://stateof.creativecommons.org with the hashtag #sotc.

» 2 COMMENTS Share
cheyenne_h on 04/25/2017 at 01:29PM

All Ages: Kid-Friendly Music on FMA

A selection of albums from Kazoomzoom, a netlabel for kids.

The FMA's Terms of Use indicate that the intended audience for our archive is anyone 13 or older, but there are tracks on FMA appropriate for listeners of any age. But how to find them??

Lots of music on our site is available for use in noncommercial, educational contexts, so it's no surprise that teachers come looking for music they can use in student projects and for general classroom use. (Psst - if you're an educator with questions, check out our special FAQ, just for you!) But looking for audio that's safe for non-commercial use doesn't always return the most kid-friendly results. 

There's the netlabel for kids, Kazoomzoom, has been with FMA for years, and releases with names like "The Ambient Baby" -- but we wanted to make a better, easier way for parents and teachers to find music they could use.

Our best solution to this was to incorporate a new genre tag, "Kid-friendly," which collects all music that is either by kids, for kids, or both! If you cruise around this page, you'll find all sorts of stuff - songs about pants that try to ride a bike on their own, pirate songs, bouncy chiptunes, and much more! However, some of these songs may have lyrics or themes that are intended for specific ages within the kid-friendly range - so we ask that parents and educators still preview the music before sharing it with a younger audience. 

Are you a parent or educator looking for instrumentals? Try Podington Bear's short & catchy CC BY-NC instrumental treasure trove (and it's safe for use in video!) or the fabulous collection of classical music from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

Do you make music for kids and want to add yours to the collection? Get in touch or comment below!

» 1 COMMENTS Share
cheyenne_h on 03/29/2017 at 08:27PM

New Curator Spotlight: Commune Oreille

Commune Oreille's logo.

If you've been paying attention to the recently added music to our little website, you've probably noticed a few new curators popping up in the results. One of these noteworthy newcomers is Commune Oreille. Some curators are actual radio stations, but this one is a radio show affiliated with Radio Zinzine.

Commune Oreille is also a collective that organizes live performances in a small town in southern France, Forcalquier. Some of the live recordings found in their curator area are from these concerts.

With a focus on free music and frequent live guests, they're off to a great start. So far, more than 150 songs have been added to FMA by Commune Oreille, and we're looking forward to much more!

Though many curators have an identifiable, genred focus, Commune Oreille's collection spans a variety of musical styles. Angry noise-rockers SEC, twee indie-punks Mega Gem, chiptune composers 1UP Collectif, beatmaster Panda Dub and accordion-fueled post rockers Dure Mere are just a few of the fresh sounds you can explore! To make it a little easier on you, they've put together a playlist of highlights to enjoy, but don't let that stop you from diving in to their full catalog.

 
» 5 COMMENTS Share
cheyenne_h on 03/20/2017 at 11:57AM

FMA Q&A: Public Domain Wonders from Monplaisir

Monplaisir: A one-man public domain music machine. Photo courtesy of the artist.

Monplaisir is a man of many bands, and if you've ever cruised through the Public Domain offerings at FMA, you're likely to have encountered a project or two of his! He is devoted to sharing his music as openly as possible with a CC0 license, which allows for any type of re-use, and is internationally recognized as being dedicated to the public domain. Of course, it doesn't hurt to give credit when you use a Public Domain track, but there are no limitations to what you can use this music for. You can find some "Best Of" tracks in this collection: "Let's Hear That Crap!

FMA: Tell me about your music projects on the FMA - you have a few. (Monplaisir, Alpha Hydrae, Komiku, etc). Do they each represent a different style or approach to music?

Monplaisir: I've started producing music under the name of Alpha Hydrae and after few years the name became boring so I've changed to Monplaisir. Monplaisir is like my nickname for everything that fit in noise rock/folk, Komiku is dedicated for the soundtrack of videogames that don't exist which can have some similarities with work under the Monplaisir nickname, Demoiselle Döner is for harshnoise/remix/cold electro, BG du 72 is french noisy songs about love and kindness. With this, I've some bands, SUMMER, frontwave/noise rock, Cuicuitte, a brut folk band with my friend Otite Noire, Pas Dans Le Cul Aujourd'hui, a heavy noise & guitar band, U-Man, improvised french songs... All those names are different ways to approach the music and reach the flow.

FMA: Do you collaborate with others or do you prefer to make music alone?

Monplaisir: I love to collaborate with musicians and to do music alone. Doing music alone is really cool to make fast and precise music, but sometimes it's difficult to make new music because of the lack of chaos and influence. I often collaborate with musicians to do improvisation like in U-Man and Pas Dans Le Cul Aujourd'hui, it's sometimes a pain but really surprising and rewarding.

FMA: Where do you get ideas for songs and albums?

Monplaisir:
Most of the time I get my ideas by trying to do the same kind of music as other bands I listen often (like Cindy Lee, Vampillia, Xinlisupreme, Natural Snow Buildings...). Also I love to have challenges, like, to produce a maximum of music in a short time (Baisers de Sonora was recorded in 26 hours for the FAWM2017), to only use one instrument or two, or like for my project Komiku to create a soundtrack for something that doesn't exist. And when I'm stuck, I look for new guitars and effect pedals.

FMA: Why do you choose to license your work with a CC0/Public Domain license?

Monplaisir: I've chosen the CC0 licence for multiple reasons. First, because I hate the copyright logo, a little C alone in a bubble, so sad. Second, for obvious political choices. I find the actual copyright in France and USA completely absurd. It's based in a philosophy I really don't like, an old individualist way of seeing the culture, which is really sad and greedy. So I want to participate to the alternative. I've seen how it's hard for some people to remix stuff for their own project because of copyright. If I can help to save other artists some time and money to express themselves, all the better. Also, I really don't care about what people do with my music, except when people are oppresive against other people and using my music to do so. I find that a bit rude.

>>  CLICK THE LINK BELOW TO READ MORE!  >>


READ MORE
» 1 COMMENTS Share
cheyenne_h on 03/08/2017 at 09:28AM

New Curator Spotlight: Golden Festival

Golden Festival photo by Oresti Tsonopoulos, via flickr.

The Zlatne Uste Golden Festival is a beloved annual music festival in Brooklyn, NY. Though portions of it are broadcast live on WFMU's Transpacific Sound Paradise with Rob W, much more is recorded and added to the FMA. Just this year, more than 30 performances were added to the archive - no small feat! There is Swedish folk dance music, overtone singing from Georgia (the country), Balkan brass, accordion solos, ancient instrument ensembles, and much more!

We are pleased to announce that the Golden Festival recordings are all being added to its own curator page now - so if you're looking for a Balkan Folk Fix, you can find it, reliably, here: http://freemusicarchive.org/curator/Golden_Festival/

Thanks to all our on-site and online volunteers, as well as WFMU, for helping make this collection possible.

» 0 COMMENTS Share
TAGGED AS:
golden festival
1-10 of 177 Per Page: 01  /  02  /  03  /  04  /  05  /  06  /  07  /  …  /  18  /  NEXT »