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“Tony Conrad” (Used 15 times)

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miscellaniac on 03/15/2013 at 11:00AM

Patrick, You're A Saint

Image courtesy of bollesbiggestfan1/flickr

In honor of St. Patrick's Day, I present a mix made up of artists who currently reside in Ireland, have Irish roots, or simply a pronounced Irish influence. As you'll discover, not all Irish music sounds like what you would hear at a parade or a sports pub (aka. a spub, like a spud - Irish!). For more overtly Irish-sounding tunes, I recommend this Magically Delicious Mix featuring "Irish Hearts" by Fred van Eps.

Patrick J. Touhey “Drowsy Maggie” - OK, this is one of the few exceptions to my preface, but this is such a gorgeous traditional folk song. Irish-American Touhey played the Uilleann pipes (Irish bagpipes) and this recording is from 1919.

Dublin Duck Dispensary "Irish Rebel Song" - Now I really am starting to look like a hypocrite. But, Bobby Aherne's lo-fi solo act is one of my faves and he happens to be from Dublin and to also have produced this dreamy song that sounds like it could have emanated from the recent crop of Northern New Jersey bands like Big Troubles, Ducktails, and Julian Lynch.

Nora O'Connor "Two Way Action" - O'Connor is a first-generation Irish-American (and native Chicagoan), performs with Andrew Bird and The Blacks, has toured with everyone from Mavis Staples to New Pornographers, and also happens to be a renowned bartender, doula, and ordained reverend. (Yeah, what have YOU done today?) The eclectic warmth of all of these endeavors melts through in this track.

Sláinte "Julia Delaney" - Another one to slip past my preamble, Sláinte is a legit Irish band from Tacoma. Pronounced "slawn-cha" it is Gaelic for "cheers" or "good health." This is definitely one you can get jiggy with (sorry). Combines the good parts of a jam band with stunning traditional instrumentation that would kick the crud out of an Irish Spring commercial.

Solvents "Yr. Ghostwriter" - Bandmembers Emily Madden and Jarrod Bramson met when Bramson played rhythm guitar in Madden's father's traditional Irish folk band. The spark that crackled into Solvents lays its melodic residue all over rich violin and vocals.

 


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andrewcsmith on 04/29/2011 at 10:32AM

Table of the Elements: The Copernicium Festival

Image from Robert Longo's Pictures for Music (1979), which will be shown with a performance of Rhys Chatham's Guitar Trio on May 13, 2011, at ISSUE Project Room.

The label Table of the Elements lives up to its name: nothing more than elemental, and nothing short of encyclopedic. They’ve released a 4-CD box set by Tony Conrad titled “Early Minimalism,” and they’ve kept available a number of truly foundational works by Rhys Chatham, among them “Two Gongs” and “Die Donnergotter.” The concept of cover art was reinvented in the early age of the CD; a 128 page book was included with the 7-disc Charley Patton revival collection “Screamin’ and Hollerin’ the Blues,” where used copies fetch around $200 on Amazon. The list goes on and on, with a dual focus on the avant-garde and on so-called primitive American musics: from John Fahey’s fingerpicking to Zeena Parkins’ electro-acoustic harp.

But the periodic table is only so large, and eighteen years later the label has reached the end of it. To celebrate this occasion, the label has assembled a three-night Copernicium Festival (May 12 – 14, $20 a night or $15 for ISSUE members) as a massive sendoff, with artists ranging from Stephen O’Malley, to Jonathan Kane’s February, to Tony Conrad, to Zeena Parkins, to a performance of Rhys Chatham’s Guitar Trio with a small guitar army. It’ll traverse minimalism, blues, death metal, free improvisation, film, and visual art (with projections of Robert Longo’s Pictures for Music from 1979).

I’ve uploaded tracks from Jonathan Kane’s February releases February and Jet Ear Party, as well as a recording of Zeena Parkins’ March 2010 duo with violinist Jon Rose. The mix also includes a track from Peg Simone’s performance at ISSUE which later appeared on her Table of the Elements release Secrets from the Storm, and a live performance by death-sludge-metal artists Sunn O))), whose Stephen O’Malley will headline the final night of the series. Check out the attached mix, and come by any or all of the three nights to celebrate the conclusion of a great label.

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andrewcsmith on 04/29/2011 at 10:32AM

Table of the Elements: The Copernicium Festival

Image from Robert Longo's Pictures for Music (1979), which will be shown with a performance of Rhys Chatham's Guitar Trio on May 13, 2011, at ISSUE Project Room.

The label Table of the Elements lives up to its name: nothing more than elemental, and nothing short of encyclopedic. They’ve released a 4-CD box set by Tony Conrad titled “Early Minimalism,” and they’ve kept available a number of truly foundational works by Rhys Chatham, among them “Two Gongs” and “Die Donnergotter.” The concept of cover art was reinvented in the early age of the CD; a 128 page book was included with the 7-disc Charley Patton revival collection “Screamin’ and Hollerin’ the Blues,” where used copies fetch around $200 on Amazon. The list goes on and on, with a dual focus on the avant-garde and on so-called primitive American musics: from John Fahey’s fingerpicking to Zeena Parkins’ electro-acoustic harp.

But the periodic table is only so large, and eighteen years later the label has reached the end of it. To celebrate this occasion, the label has assembled a three-night Copernicium Festival (May 12 – 14, $20 a night or $15 for ISSUE members) as a massive sendoff, with artists ranging from Stephen O’Malley, to Jonathan Kane’s February, to Tony Conrad, to Zeena Parkins, to a performance of Rhys Chatham’s Guitar Trio with a small guitar army. It’ll traverse minimalism, blues, death metal, free improvisation, film, and visual art (with projections of Robert Longo’s Pictures for Music from 1979).

I’ve uploaded tracks from Jonathan Kane’s February releases February and Jet Ear Party, as well as a recording of Zeena Parkins’ March 2010 duo with violinist Jon Rose. The mix also includes a track from Peg Simone’s performance at ISSUE which later appeared on her Table of the Elements release Secrets from the Storm, and a live performance by death-sludge-metal artists Sunn O))), whose Stephen O’Malley will headline the final night of the series. Check out the attached mix, and come by any or all of the three nights to celebrate the conclusion of a great label.

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andrewcsmith on 10/15/2010 at 10:00AM

Drone 5k

In training for the Electric Temple-hosted Drone Marathon this Saturday at ISSUE Project Room, we've put together this mix of drones to get you through your Friday. Hopefully you'll be all limbered up and ready to drone by 2 p.m. on Saturday—think of this one as a Drone 5k.

The brand-new label Electric Temple ambitously looks to be both a production company and record label. Putting together events as well as putting out recordings, their goal is to challenge audiences by crossing generational and genre-based gaps in the avant-garde world. The lineup they've put together for this marathon definitely does that: drone godfathers Phill Niblock and Tony Conrad are on the same bill as younger artists like Noveller, Marcia Bassett, and Tom Carter. The entire schedule (the whole 10 hours of it) is posted on the main page, but the juxtaposition of "conceptual drones" by Pitchfork-praised Kyle Bobby Dunn, Downtown staple Aki Onda, and Tony Conrad's Three Loops for Performers and Tape Recorders from 1961 looks like they're out to expand everyone's horizons. And isn't that what drones are all about?

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andrewcsmith on 09/13/2010 at 12:10PM

MV Carbon + Metalux + Aki Onda this Friday at ISSUE

Photo by Kenzo Niwa

MV Carbon continues her residency at ISSUE Project Room with a free concert this Friday, appearing with J. Graf (as Metalux) followed by a duo with Aki Onda. Metalux grinds with echoes of heavy metal and dystopian industrial apparatuses, and feels both claustrophobic and remote. Analog synth sweeps combine with gritty transistor distortion, and the vocals (when there are vocals) are almost totally obscured.

I've added some Metalux tracks below, as well as an excerpt from Carbon's July 17 performance at ISSUE, the first of her residency. July was Floating Points month at ISSUE, so all performances highlighted our fifteen-channel hanging speaker system. Carbon's was no exception: she projected repeated loops throughout the venue, with the intention of creating a state of paranoia. "It's almost like a closed circuit in their head when they keep believing something and believing it and believing it even if it's not true."

An integral aspect of Carbon's art is her instrument-building. She has makeshift cellos attached to Moog synth pedals, sometimes with guitar fretboards and other times with TVs for bodies. Clips of some of these instruments are in a video after the jump, as well as an excerpt from Tony Conrad's interview of Carbon, filmed and edited for her residency.


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