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cheyenne_h on 06/28/2016 at 05:51PM

Not All Music on FMA is Licensed for Video

Some of our music is just for listening. Sorry video-making friends! (image via flickr commons)

Just a friendly reminder.

We know, the FMA is a great resource for all sorts of people - filmmakers, remix artists, people who wanna hear strange new sounds - but we've been getting a LOT of messages lately from confused people about whether or not they can use X song in Y video.

It depends on the license, and how you intend to use the music, my friend! And best of all, you can find out all the information you need on your own. There are tons of resources out there to help.

We have a robust FAQ (complete with webinar!) about which licenses are suitable for video here. But here are some basics:

1. ND or No Derivatives: If you want to use a track from FMA for a video, you are not allowed to use anything with an "ND" or "No Derivatives" clause in the license. You must get further permission from the artist in order to use it for a video.

2. NC or Non Commercial: If you want to use a track for commercial purposes (including a monetized YouTube video, a real estate listing, or a video telling people about a product or service that costs money), anything with a "NC" or "Non Commercial" clause is not pre-cleared for this type of use. If you want to use it for a commercial purpose, you must get further written permission from the artist, and possibly pay for a license to use the song.

3. SA or Share Alike: If you want to use a track that is licensed CC BY-SA "Share Alike" or CC BY-NC-SA, you are required by that license to share your own work under the identical license. If you can't, or don't want to, do this, you must get further written permission from the artist. (Noticing a pattern yet?)

4. BY or Attribution: Anything with a CC license with "BY" or "Attribution" in it means you must give credit to the artist, but that's it. You can use it for whatever you want, even derivative works like videos and remixes. If you don't want to, or can't give attribution in your derivative work (such as a video)... guess what? You have to get further permission from the artist! (Now you're getting it!)

We have pre-screened a lot of stuff and it's tucked neatly in the Music For Video curator page (though this includes NC and SA tracks - so make sure to look for the license you need). You can also use stuff from our Public Domain collection without attributing or getting permission from the artist.

If you need guidance, please consult our FAQs, License Guide or read up on the Creative Commons website before asking - you may find the answer right in front of you!

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cheyenne_h on 04/13/2016 at 10:30AM

"The Daily Dose" Documentary Soundtracked With FMA's Help

A screenshot from the film.

A little while back, we got an email inquiring about using a song from the Free Music Archive for a documentary film. We get requests like this a lot, and sometimes the filmmakers aren't as fluent in CC licenses as we are. Since the song was CC BY-NC-ND, it wasn't licensed for use in film or derivative works. But we put our heads together and tracked down the right people to ask for permission.

Jackie Ruth Murray, the South African filmmaker who contacted us, co-runs a production company called Reel Epics Productions in Cape Town. She found out about the FMA via a web search and was looking for music to score her short documentary film, "The Daily Dose," an autobiographical account of taking antiretroviral medication.

The film has recently been selected to screen at the Encounters International Documentary Festival, a South African documentary film fest that also hosts classes and film industry related events.

CH: How did you search for music, and what did you find?

JRM: I searched for a general genre which i felt was fitting for the narrative of my film. I then narrowed it down to approximately 10 songs which supported the tempo of my film. I found a song titled “Heaven is The Other Way” by Big Sandy and His Fly-Rite Boys. The song is written by the band’s frontman, Robert Williams. The lyrics of the song uncannily match the message of my film.

CH: Do you prefer Creative Commons music to fully copyrighted music?

JRM: I don’t have much experience with fully copyrighted music. However before finding FMA, I did originally attempt to acquire a licence for a song which was fully copyrighted. My search became very laborious as i was directed to a number of different companies. I eventually gave up for lack of clear directive and because of the length of time that it took.

CH: Was the process of contacting the artist/record label intimidating or difficult?

JRM: My experience with FMA was not in the least bit intimidating or difficult.  The director of FMA, Cheyenne Hohman was extremely helpful and timely in her responses to my enquiries. She assisted me in contacting Bill Hunt from Cow Island Music, the band’s record label. Bill put me in touch with Robert Williams from Big Sandy and His Fly-Rite Boys. I sent Robert a link to my film to give him an idea of how i wanted to use his song. Robert was very open and willing for his song to be used and even went so far as contacting the record licence companies, Yep Rock and BMG to give his permission for me to use his song. From there, BMG and Yep Rock speedily organised the licence for me. I then received an email from The David Gresham Music Company here in South Africa, who arranged the music licence for me. They took the fact that i made my documentary on a next-to-nothing budget with no commercial gain purposes into account and gave me a discount which i was very grateful for. To sum up, i was blown away with the support i received from all involved.

CH: Did the FMA help you achieve your goal of using this piece of music?

JRM: Yes, as explained above, absolutely. The FMA also helped me understand the Creative Commons legalities.

CH: How did you ultimately end up using the song?

JRM: I used the song in its entirety and split it into three consecutive parts: for the introduction of the film, as a link between act 1 and three of the film and finally for the end of the film.

CH: Will you use the Free Music Archive for projects in the future?

JRM: I have told my colleagues at Reel Epics Productions about the FMA and we will definitely be using the archive for future projects.

You can find out more about the film at https://www.facebook.com/thedailydosedocumentary/

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cheyenne_h on 07/07/2015 at 02:15PM

Free Music for Video Makers

 

We've been getting a few questions about using music in videos again! We're always happy to field questions, but I'd like to share a video of the webinar that Elliot Harmon of Creative Commons and I hosted earlier this year, which will walk you through the basics of using music from the Free Music Archive in your next video production. For more in-depth Q&A, please visit our Video FAQ. If you're just looking for music to use in a video, cruise over to our "Music For Video" curator portal. 

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cheyenne_h on 01/20/2015 at 09:45AM

Video Makers: Your Webinar Awaits! January 21st at 3PM EST

"The Royal Navy Instructional Film Unit, 19 August 1942. A11506" by Royal Navy official photographer, Ware, C J (Lt) - http://media.iwm.org.uk/iwm/mediaLib//7/media-7112/large.jpgThis is photograph A 11506 from the collections of the Imperial War Museums.. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons.

Hi FMA'ers! 

If you make videos, or you make music for videos, or you just like learning new stuff, tune in tomorrow to our webinar! We'll be allowing a few guests in to our Hangout and then broadcasting for everyone else. 

The webinar is here, on YouTube

Special guest and Creative Commons expert Elliot Harmon will be co-hosting with Cheyenne. We'll show you around the Free Music Archive (including where to find license and contact info for artists), run through the basics of Creative Commons licenses and how to use CC tracks in videos, and show you how you can license your work under Creative Commons (spoiler: it's easy!). 

We're looking forward to seeing you there! If you can't make it, we'll be archiving the webinars so you can watch later. 

Next week, we'll host one for K-12 teachers, and in early February we'll have one for you musical types. 

Hooray! 

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ange on 12/26/2013 at 05:15PM

Deck Your Projects: Holiday Instrumentals

[Photo by krypto/Flickr]

Before your Christmas music fatigue sets in, unwrap this selection of festive and sparkly instrumental tracks for your holiday projects. Featured artists include Dan LerchSilence Is SexyLive Action Fezz and Candlegravity, a San Franciscan living in Tokyo. Plus, a few songs from junior85Seth PartridgePeter RudenkoJared C. Balogh and Freddy & the Indifferents. I threw in a few wonky oddball tracks towards the end from from Simon MathewsonRainbroPompey, and No Monster Club. The final song by OWL BRAIN ATLAS features wind and chimes, and could be used for many other things that are trying to caputre a cold feeling.

DOWNLOAD THE ENTIRE MIX

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