You came this way: Home > Tag: Fma Qa

“Fma Qa” (Used 5 times)

Related Articles

cheyenne_h on 03/20/2017 at 11:57AM

FMA Q&A: Public Domain Wonders from Monplaisir

Monplaisir: A one-man public domain music machine. Photo courtesy of the artist.

Monplaisir is a man of many bands, and if you've ever cruised through the Public Domain offerings at FMA, you're likely to have encountered a project or two of his! He is devoted to sharing his music as openly as possible with a CC0 license, which allows for any type of re-use, and is internationally recognized as being dedicated to the public domain. Of course, it doesn't hurt to give credit when you use a Public Domain track, but there are no limitations to what you can use this music for. You can find some "Best Of" tracks in this collection: "Let's Hear That Crap!

FMA: Tell me about your music projects on the FMA - you have a few. (Monplaisir, Alpha Hydrae, Komiku, etc). Do they each represent a different style or approach to music?

Monplaisir: I've started producing music under the name of Alpha Hydrae and after few years the name became boring so I've changed to Monplaisir. Monplaisir is like my nickname for everything that fit in noise rock/folk, Komiku is dedicated for the soundtrack of videogames that don't exist which can have some similarities with work under the Monplaisir nickname, Demoiselle Döner is for harshnoise/remix/cold electro, BG du 72 is french noisy songs about love and kindness. With this, I've some bands, SUMMER, frontwave/noise rock, Cuicuitte, a brut folk band with my friend Otite Noire, Pas Dans Le Cul Aujourd'hui, a heavy noise & guitar band, U-Man, improvised french songs... All those names are different ways to approach the music and reach the flow.

FMA: Do you collaborate with others or do you prefer to make music alone?

Monplaisir: I love to collaborate with musicians and to do music alone. Doing music alone is really cool to make fast and precise music, but sometimes it's difficult to make new music because of the lack of chaos and influence. I often collaborate with musicians to do improvisation like in U-Man and Pas Dans Le Cul Aujourd'hui, it's sometimes a pain but really surprising and rewarding.

FMA: Where do you get ideas for songs and albums?

Monplaisir:
Most of the time I get my ideas by trying to do the same kind of music as other bands I listen often (like Cindy Lee, Vampillia, Xinlisupreme, Natural Snow Buildings...). Also I love to have challenges, like, to produce a maximum of music in a short time (Baisers de Sonora was recorded in 26 hours for the FAWM2017), to only use one instrument or two, or like for my project Komiku to create a soundtrack for something that doesn't exist. And when I'm stuck, I look for new guitars and effect pedals.

FMA: Why do you choose to license your work with a CC0/Public Domain license?

Monplaisir: I've chosen the CC0 licence for multiple reasons. First, because I hate the copyright logo, a little C alone in a bubble, so sad. Second, for obvious political choices. I find the actual copyright in France and USA completely absurd. It's based in a philosophy I really don't like, an old individualist way of seeing the culture, which is really sad and greedy. So I want to participate to the alternative. I've seen how it's hard for some people to remix stuff for their own project because of copyright. If I can help to save other artists some time and money to express themselves, all the better. Also, I really don't care about what people do with my music, except when people are oppresive against other people and using my music to do so. I find that a bit rude.

>>  CLICK THE LINK BELOW TO READ MORE!  >>


READ MORE
» 1 COMMENTS Share
cheyenne_h on 01/25/2017 at 02:44PM

FMA Q&A: "The Gateway Bug" Soundtracked with FMA's Help

A still from the film's trailer. Find it here.

A few weeks ago we got a message from a couple of producers, Johanna Kelly and Cameron Marshad, who were working on a film. They wanted some help getting in touch with the band Atlantic Thrills, because their song "Bed Bugs" from a WFMU Live performance had caught their attention. They wanted to use it to accompany the ending credits of their upcoming documentary, "The Gateway Bug."

The film is an exploration of 'entomophagy,' or, as you might call it in plain English, eating insects! Many have touted this practice as a way to conserve natual resources and take advantage of a food source that is nutritious, easy to cultivate, and plentiful, especially in parts of the world that have not embraced the practice. The film will debut at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival on February 2, 2017. More info can be found here.

FMA: Tell me about your project, "The Gateway Bug."  

Johanna: Our fully independent documentary exposes America's disconnect with food as pivotal tipping point for climate change and global warming. Following the terrifying paper presented in 2013 by the UN that food production must double by 2050 to feed Earth's exploding population, and their warning that at this rate, that’s impossible - we needed to know how and why. Upon finding that nutrition is direct result of culture and policy, everyday activities like eating, gardening and grocery shopping become revolutionary acts. This film converts viewers into activists, inviting exploration of taste, ethics and taboos to ignite social change through education.

Cameron: "The Gateway Bug" explores the booming edible insect industry now taking hold in Western countries as a direct response to the unsustainable agricultural practices we’ve witnessed over the last several decades. We discovered the topic through our friend studying at UCSB, and for his thesis he was tasked with developing a business that solves an ecological problem. The problem he was most familiar with was the overfishing of our oceans, and he proposed we start using insects as fish feed, rather than wild fish. Johanna and I found this fascinating, especially when we started talking about insects for human consumption.

FMA: Why did you want to make a film about this topic?

Cameron: The earth and its population are facing many crises at the moment, and food is one big part of that puzzle. We can't survive without it. I am an adventurous eater, and when I heard about humans starting to eat insects in the US, the land of the free and home the quarter pounder with cheese, I was immediately entranced. The reason I wanted to make this film was to tell the story about climate change from a different perspective, one that involves food culture breaking social norms.

Johanna: I'm a filmmaker because I'm a film-lover and I watch a lot of documentaries. It's kind of my favourite way to learn these days and I think a lot of people feel the same way. You can spend weeks trying to finish a book on something you want to know more about, or you can just sit down on your couch and be an expert in a couple of hours. These issues and solutions stand to change the world, so what better way to share them than in the easily digestible (HA!) form of a film? I hope our film helps people see how easy it is to help the planet and minimise climate change. Which in turn hopefully also makes them feel damn good about themselves, improving their health through better nutrition is just a happy side effect in my eyes.

FMA: Do you consider the purpose of the film educational, social, culinary, or something else?

Cameron: I believe the purpose of the film is to enable free thought around how our food is made and how we define what is food. It's a mix of educational, social, and culinary commentary; we meet chefs, farmers, celebrities, and Washington leaders, so we show the burgeoning edible insect industry from multiple angles. We also use archival footage throughout, which is meant to invoke a feeling of "Wait, we've been talking about this stuff for years, why hasn't anything changed?" I think it is a call to action, to encourage new ways of thinking about food production and food culture and their environmental consequences.

Johanna: I think it covers a lot of ground: social impact, environmental, culinary exploration of culture, what it means to survive in America, eating an American diet and how that's a vastly different experience depending on where you were born. We go from cricket farms in food deserts across the rust belt and the water crisis in Flint Michigan to high end restaurants on the lower east side in New York City. From tech geeks in Silicon Valley to Aquaponic farms in Santa Barbara and everything in between.

>>READ MORE below for more answers, further reading, and links!


READ MORE
» 0 COMMENTS Share
cheyenne_h on 11/10/2016 at 05:48PM

FMA Q&A: Monkey Warhol

Image courtesy of Monkey Warhol

Here are the FMA, there are few ways to measure the popularity or success of a new artist - downloads, streams/listens, and, probably most importantly, distribution. By sharing songs under Creative Commons licenses that allow for reuse in video, many artists get to reach an audience that they would have never touched before. This has been the case with recent addition Monkey Warhol. His music has shown up in skateboarding vids, reverse cooking tutorials, video game play-throughs, drawing demonstrations, and even a creepy Dada-esque fan video!

You can lisen to Monkey Warhol's first FMA release, the Darwin LP, here - or watch the official music video for "Lovely Lady":

 

 

FMA: Where are you from?

MW: Minnesota.  The land of Bob Dylan, Prince, The Replacements, Hüsker Dü, Soul Asylum, Owl City, and Steven Greenberg (he's the guy behind the disco hit "Funkytown")!  Amazing place, isn't it?

FMA: Yeah, not bad! How long have you been interested in music?

MW: Forever (or at least as long as I can remember)...  As a young padawan my parents would prop me up against the family piano, and I would annoy them with my insistent pounding.  Now that I have a family of my own, I continue to annoy them with my insistent pounding; but since I'm the dad, they can't tell me to stop!  (Actually, they can…  I just don't have to listen.)  I guess some things never change.
 
FMA: How would you describe your music to someone who hasn't heard it?

MW: In general… electronic, poppy, hyper, energetic, and fun!  Of course in my mind, my music sounds like a super hip amalgamation of Andrew WK, Daft Punk, and the Flaming Lips.  However, in reality, it probably sounds closer to Moby moonlighting at a "Weird Al" Yankovic concert.

FMA: Where does your name, "Monkey Warhol," come from - and do you consider Andy Warhol to be an influence on your creative process?

MW: "Monkey" is what Mama and Papa Warhol called me when I was a little baboon pounding on the piano, and I guess it just kinda stuck!

However, digging a bit deeper and to geek out, I remember hearing about the "Infinite Monkey Theorem" which states that given enough time any monkey could type Shakespeare and Andy Warhol was quoted as saying "In the future everybody will be world-famous for 15 minutes."  So I guess that sums up my musical aspirations and "Internet Culture" in general... Mama Warhol knew best!

FMA: There are many layers to your songs. Where do you usually begin?

MW: The majority of my songs start with silence, and then I build them from there with a chord progression, hook, or pattern.  Through years and years of experience, I've learned that it's best to have an idea for the various parts of a song complete before I hit "record" or else I end up with a hard drive full of half-finished tracks.

As for the layers, I think it's largely due to being self-produced where on playback I'm constantly tweaking, refining, and adding a little "spice" to the mix in order to keep the energy up and keep myself interested.  Actually, it's funny that you mention the layers as I've been consciously trying to refine my production skills and scale back the layers thinking that sometimes less is more... I've actually gone from about 100 tracks a song to 50, so I'm gradually scaling back, but I realize it's still a bit excessive.

FMA: It sounds (and looks) like there are some kids involved in your music (judging from Lovely Lady, in particular). Would you consider your music to be "for kids"?

MW: While I don't set out to write music specifically for children, I'm not surprised that my "sound" combined with my willingness to follow through on stupid/silly ideas (i.e. the "Lovely Lady" video or playing live in a monkey mask) might catch the attention and enthusiasm of some kids.  That said, I still make music for myself, but am honored and flattered by anyone who is willing to take the time and give my music a listen! 


READ MORE
» 2 COMMENTS Share
TAGGED AS:
fma qa, monkey warhol
cheyenne_h on 10/24/2016 at 02:16PM

FMA Q&A: Birthday Songs Find New Life On YouTube

"Greg's Birthday" by Fred Karklin on flickr. CC BY-NC-SA.

AppleBerry Blues (May) is a Youtuber in Toronto who runs the Youtube channel "Birthday Songs" which has been running since July 2016 and already boasts around 100 videos. She is currently a student and spends most of her time attending classes, writing and studying. She's also on Facebook. FMA Director Cheyenne tracked her down and asked her some questions about her channel and how it's bringing fresh eyes (and ears!) to many of our Free Birthday Songs. We at FMA HQ are especially pleased that the charmingly-NSFW "Foul Mouthed Birthday Robot" got a video and does a little dance:

FMA: Why did you decide to start making birthday song videos and posting them online?

ABB: I wanted to have a Youtube channel with videos that could be watched forever and never become dated.  Since birthdays are celebrated by people everyday I thought birthdays would be a good topic.  I also wanted to have a Youtube channel with a positive focus and I generally feel that birthdays have a lot of positive energy associated with them.

FMA: What's your favorite part about making birthday song videos?

ABB: I have the freedom to be creative and do anything I want because I work alone on the channel. I enjoy that I can wake up with an idea on a Saturday morning, and have a video using that idea posted for the world to see by Saturday afternoon. One day I might be working on secret birthday codes, the next day I might do a collage, the following day I might sketch something, the next day I might collect some birthday themed pictures from flickr and assemble them.  I don’t really have a plan, I just do whatever feels inspiring that day with the channel.

FMA: Had you known about the Free Music Archive for long before you started making videos with birthday songs from our public domain collection?

ABB: I had never heard of the FMA before working on my birthday channel.  After deciding to make Birthday Song videos, I stumbled upon the FMA while searching for free birthday songs online. As of October 14, I’ve used 46 songs from the FMA. Some I've used more than once. 1 song  I've used 7 times! In total I have made 84 videos from birthday songs from the FMA. The songs I used the most are:

1. Happy Birthday To You Alternative by Armin Rüdiger Vieweg (7 times)
2. Simple New Happy Birthday Melody by Sascha Ende (5 times)
3. Swine Flu Birthday by The Mostly Bad Virus (4 times)
4. The PD Happy Birthday Song by Iron Curtain (4 times)
5. Happy Birthday by Technetium (4 times)

FMA: What do you use to make the videos (software, equipment, etc)?

ABB: I use a pocket size spiral notebook that I take everywhere where; I jot down ideas whenever they come to mind. My computer, a Dell Pentium 4 running Windows XP. The software I use includes PowerPoint 2003 and Windows Movie Maker 5.1. I also use a FujiFilm FinePixL30 that I use for photography.

FMA: Do you post anywhere besides YouTube? Why or why not?

ABB: Youtube is the main place that I post videos.  I log into youtube everyday to upload a video and respond to any comments. At the end of September, I posted some videos on Dailymotion.  I haven’t decided if I will keep posting videos on Dailymotion and have honestly only logged in a few times since initially posting some videos.I also started a new facebook page at the end of September and directly share my birthday videos from youtube to facebook. I have only posted 6 videos directly onto Facebook.  After seeing the Danish documentary, Facebookistan, I purposely spend as little time on Facebook as possible. I was never really a major facebook fan anyway but seeing that documentary solidified my reasons for using it as little as possible.

Lots more after the jump!


READ MORE
» 1 COMMENTS Share
TAGGED AS:
fma qa, birthday songs
cheyenne_h on 04/13/2016 at 10:30AM

FMA Q&A: "The Daily Dose" Documentary Soundtracked With FMA's Help

A screenshot from the film.

A little while back, we got an email inquiring about using a song from the Free Music Archive for a documentary film. We get requests like this a lot, and sometimes the filmmakers aren't as fluent in CC licenses as we are. Since the song was CC BY-NC-ND, it wasn't licensed for use in film or derivative works. But we put our heads together and tracked down the right people to ask for permission.

Jackie Ruth Murray, the South African filmmaker who contacted us, co-runs a production company called Reel Epics Productions in Cape Town. She found out about the FMA via a web search and was looking for music to score her short documentary film, "The Daily Dose," an autobiographical account of taking antiretroviral medication.

The film has recently been selected to screen at the Encounters International Documentary Festival, a South African documentary film fest that also hosts classes and film industry related events.

CH: How did you search for music, and what did you find?

JRM: I searched for a general genre which i felt was fitting for the narrative of my film. I then narrowed it down to approximately 10 songs which supported the tempo of my film. I found a song titled “Heaven is The Other Way” by Big Sandy and His Fly-Rite Boys. The song is written by the band’s frontman, Robert Williams. The lyrics of the song uncannily match the message of my film.

CH: Do you prefer Creative Commons music to fully copyrighted music?

JRM: I don’t have much experience with fully copyrighted music. However before finding FMA, I did originally attempt to acquire a licence for a song which was fully copyrighted. My search became very laborious as i was directed to a number of different companies. I eventually gave up for lack of clear directive and because of the length of time that it took.

CH: Was the process of contacting the artist/record label intimidating or difficult?

JRM: My experience with FMA was not in the least bit intimidating or difficult.  The director of FMA, Cheyenne Hohman was extremely helpful and timely in her responses to my enquiries. She assisted me in contacting Bill Hunt from Cow Island Music, the band’s record label. Bill put me in touch with Robert Williams from Big Sandy and His Fly-Rite Boys. I sent Robert a link to my film to give him an idea of how i wanted to use his song. Robert was very open and willing for his song to be used and even went so far as contacting the record licence companies, Yep Rock and BMG to give his permission for me to use his song. From there, BMG and Yep Rock speedily organised the licence for me. I then received an email from The David Gresham Music Company here in South Africa, who arranged the music licence for me. They took the fact that i made my documentary on a next-to-nothing budget with no commercial gain purposes into account and gave me a discount which i was very grateful for. To sum up, i was blown away with the support i received from all involved.

CH: Did the FMA help you achieve your goal of using this piece of music?

JRM: Yes, as explained above, absolutely. The FMA also helped me understand the Creative Commons legalities.

CH: How did you ultimately end up using the song?

JRM: I used the song in its entirety and split it into three consecutive parts: for the introduction of the film, as a link between act 1 and three of the film and finally for the end of the film.

CH: Will you use the Free Music Archive for projects in the future?

JRM: I have told my colleagues at Reel Epics Productions about the FMA and we will definitely be using the archive for future projects.

You can find out more about the film at https://www.facebook.com/thedailydosedocumentary/

» 0 COMMENTS Share