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newweirdaustralia on 03/01/2013 at 08:44PM

New Experimental Electronic EP from Melbourne Solo Artist The Vainglories

Solace is the new EP from The Vainglories, the solo project of Melbourne artist Gillian Lever. Described as "lullabies for the nightmare-prone," Solace blends dark undercurrents with deceptively pretty melodies, shifting rhythms and synthetic textures.

Gillian has been writing as The Vainglories since 2003, creating scores for imaginary films. Whilst living in Melbourne she played in melodic pop band Tempted and electronica duo Sweet Violentine, and contributed music to theatre, live improvised comedy and (actual) short film. In 2007, she moved to Brighton in England and created a live performance set from The Vainglories' back catalogue of extraterrestrial lullabies, playing at celebrated Brighton venues such as Komedia and The Basement. Now based in Melbourne again, as The Vainglories she constantly struggles with the grammatical difficulties that arise from being a solo artist with a name more suited to a band. 'Solace' is her first release since 2010's 'Violets' and her debut release for Australian experimental netlabel, Wood & Wire.


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newweirdaustralia on 01/28/2013 at 07:00AM

A Wild, Romantic Experiment in Ambient Electronica and Post-Classical Forms

This week sees the release of The Pomegranate Cycle by Textile Audio on Wood & Wire. Woven from song, sound textures and fragmented orchestration, The Pomegranate Cycle is the creation of composer, mezzo soprano and sound engineer Eve Klein.

Since 2002, Eve has been working as a professional operatic mezzo soprano, electronic musician and academic. The Textile Audio project finds her working with scores, field recordings, and operatic-pop composite vocals to weave rich melodic soundscapes and textures that she describes as "unashamedly romantic". With a PhD in Music and Sound from Queensland University of Technology, and over 300 shows for Opera Australia under her belt, The Pomegranate Cycle marks the culmination of many years of explorations into the marriage of opera and classical forms with contemporary audio production.

An early work, Some Kind Of Mininova opened New Weird Australia's free compilation, Volume Four, and introduced Textile Audio to an audience who were among the first to experience Eve's unique contemporary Australian experimental opera. This was shortly followed by The Pomegranate EP on Feral Media, which featured early versions of tracks from The Pomegranate Cycle as well as a wonderfully sensitive rework of The Pomegranate Cycle's Demeter's Lament by electronic producer, Gentleforce.

In an interview with Eve in Cyclic Defrost, Melonie Bayl-Smith commented on the (then) work-in-progress Pomegranate Cycle:

"In a way, whilst there is a provocative electronic subversion inherent in the disruptive industrial clicks, blips and tears that punctuate the work, it is the sheer beauty of Klein's voice, heard against itself, against the samples and lines, against the disembodied choruses, that is the glue by which The Pomegranate Cycle is most potently held together. Here, at the point of Klein's voice and its placement in the structure of the music, are operatic traditions celebrated, challenged and reframed. This is contemporary music at its most relevant - it is simultaneously inward and outward focused in addressing the challenge of its existence and its capacity to produce something great."

The Pomegranate Cycle is now available as a Free Download on FMA

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newweirdaustralia on 01/28/2013 at 07:00AM

A Wild, Romantic Experiment in Ambient Electronica and Post-Classical Forms

This week sees the release of The Pomegranate Cycle by Textile Audio on Wood & Wire. Woven from song, sound textures and fragmented orchestration, The Pomegranate Cycle is the creation of composer, mezzo soprano and sound engineer Eve Klein.

Since 2002, Eve has been working as a professional operatic mezzo soprano, electronic musician and academic. The Textile Audio project finds her working with scores, field recordings, and operatic-pop composite vocals to weave rich melodic soundscapes and textures that she describes as "unashamedly romantic". With a PhD in Music and Sound from Queensland University of Technology, and over 300 shows for Opera Australia under her belt, The Pomegranate Cycle marks the culmination of many years of explorations into the marriage of opera and classical forms with contemporary audio production.

An early work, Some Kind Of Mininova opened New Weird Australia's free compilation, Volume Four, and introduced Textile Audio to an audience who were among the first to experience Eve's unique contemporary Australian experimental opera. This was shortly followed by The Pomegranate EP on Feral Media, which featured early versions of tracks from The Pomegranate Cycle as well as a wonderfully sensitive rework of The Pomegranate Cycle's Demeter's Lament by electronic producer, Gentleforce.

In an interview with Eve in Cyclic Defrost, Melonie Bayl-Smith commented on the (then) work-in-progress Pomegranate Cycle:

"In a way, whilst there is a provocative electronic subversion inherent in the disruptive industrial clicks, blips and tears that punctuate the work, it is the sheer beauty of Klein's voice, heard against itself, against the samples and lines, against the disembodied choruses, that is the glue by which The Pomegranate Cycle is most potently held together. Here, at the point of Klein's voice and its placement in the structure of the music, are operatic traditions celebrated, challenged and reframed. This is contemporary music at its most relevant - it is simultaneously inward and outward focused in addressing the challenge of its existence and its capacity to produce something great."

The Pomegranate Cycle is now available as a Free Download on FMA

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Upitup_Records on 12/10/2012 at 11:00AM

Upitup Records Celebrates 50+ Free Releases

Welcome To Büromaschinen Cover by LRNZ

As Upitup Records prepares to enter its 10th year, we've got a lot to celebrate including a catalogue of more than 50 free releases!

One such release is Mellifluous Ichor From Sunless Regions by The Wyrding Module. One hour of sono-thaumaturgical experiments divided in 4 chapters, seamlessly executed by Salford based paramusician Christopher Gladwin, also known for being half of the legendary electronic duo Team Doyobi, who are responsible for over 15 years of incredible tunes on labels like Skam∆IcaseaTigerbeat6 and Fat CatMelliflous Ichor From Sunless Regions is a mantra-shaped lysergic trip into the unknown. 

Another recent addition is Welcome To Büromaschinen by Büromaschinen, the ideal soundtrack for the best Sci-Fi film that everybody loves but never existed. This is their first release on Upitup, and is a perfect introduction to his sound. The album features a selection of tracks produced in the last decade, including some of his secret classics like Approaching Sector XDotchidabe, Sabrina and Freescape, that are both perfect for the dancefloor and personal listening.
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natewooley on 04/13/2011 at 03:39PM

Eliane Radigue 30 Years Ago and Now

Eliane Radigue and Cat. Photo by Delphine Migueres

Eliane Radigue, really one of the great living composers in the world, was in Brooklyn last year for her New York debut performance of the epic Naldjorlak cycle.  I've been an almost rabid fan of her music after first hearing it on Lovely Music, Robert Ashley's label, and my fervor was renewed when Important Records released Triptych and Vice Versa last year. So when I found out she was coming to play in Brooklyn, I was more than ecstatic.  When I found out she would agree to do a short interview with me for DRAM and New World Radio I think I melted.

DRAM has an archival presence, meaning we are in the process of digitizing and preserving a number of stockpiles of amazing music for streaming on our site.  This is basically the meat and potatoes of my job here at the office.  My most recent project has been to work on the archive of Phill Niblock's Experimental Intermedia space.  Our first undertaking was to digitize and preserve 40 radio shows that Phill made with artists that visited the EI space in the 1980s.  Among them is an interview and live performance of Eliane Radigue.

Kismet, right?  I totally agree.  This gave me something to talk about and a neat little package to wrap it up in.  The stars were aligning in a very lovely little pattern. I should have known better. I woke up on the Sunday we were supposed to meet with the meanest of flus. The Mr. T of flus. I drank as much tea as possible, bundled up and headed out to Brooklyn anyway, eager not to miss a chance to meet with Eliane, and with the plans to keep my germ-ridden self as far away from her as I could without being rude.  On top of this, there was a lot of confusion as I walked into the space with my microphone and recorder, because there was supposed to be a recording engineer there to do a soundcheck and I guess he hadn't shown.  Glares of disappointment and disapproval hit me like waves, snapping me out of my dream of warm embraces and handshakes of friendship.  Luckily, Carol Robinson (who had been setting up the interview) realized I was just a helpless bystander, and not the engineer errant. Glares were retracted and, while no hugs were exchanged, we continued on much friendlier terms.

All in all, the stars aligned, albeit in a somewhat skewed pattern, and it was an amazing 15 minutes of talking with Eliane and Carol Robinson about their work as composer and performer respectively in a warm hotel room in downtown Brooklyn.  The piece is presented here in combination with Phill's original radio show and with excerpts from a live performance of Adnos III and Charles Curtis' performance of one of the movements of Naldjorlak.


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