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cheyenne_h on 06/21/2017 at 05:46PM

Net Neutrality Remix Event

We would never do this to you, but your ISP just might! It doesn't take much to imagine that this sort of thing will be popping up all over a non-neutral net... courtesy of Fight For The Future.

Here we go again! Net Neutrality is at risk, and we're coming together to push the FCC to preserve a neutral net. In the spirit of "THIS AGAIN?!" we have delved back into the FMA's own podcast archive and pulled a bunch of samples from our podcast about Net Neutrality from 2014 with Michael Weinberg from Public Knowledge (back then - he now works for Shapeways, and we interviewed him about IP and 3D Printing too). We've released the following soundbytes using CC0, so we encourage you to remix them to your heart's desire! 

GRAB THE NET NEUTRALITY SAMPLE PACK HERE!

Our friends at ccMixter are joining the fray - if you want to contribute to the music-making process over there, find out how you can Remix Net Neutrality.

Need stems or other bits of audio to use? No prob! We have a few beat pack and stem packs (Loop Mania, Bonus Beat Blast, Not Drunk) and of course there are tons of resources for this purpose over at ccMixter.org and freesound.org.

Of course, you're also welcome to grab something from our vast Public Domain/CC0 collections and mix with those, including our microSong Challenge and Masters Remastered Challenge, all of which have been released into the public domain by the goodwill of FMA artists and contributors! 

TO SUBMIT VIA FMA, EMAIL US.

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La_bl_netlabel on 05/06/2017 at 03:48PM

Channel Surfing - "Paradox In The Bathroom" [LBN039]

Channel Surfing - "Paradox In The Bathroom" [LBN039] (April 29, 2017)

 
Channel Surfing is a quasi-vaporwave project. Meaning that it predates vaporwave, and was initially influenced by the glitch and idm scenes of the 90′s and early 2000′s. With Channel Surfing, the focus is on microhouse and shoegaze. On ‘Paradox In The Bathroom’. . . I took a detour, and focused on lyrics. This time, it was the political solitude of an uncertain future. The in-between moments, of both turmoil and tranquility in America. Sonically, ‘Paradox’ uses Sound Design as a songwriting tool. Drum machines were treated like synthesizers, field recordings were processed like guitars. It is a very environmental spin on the “rock formula”. Channel Surfing is the band from the Mojave Desert. The locus of Channel Surfing is “Ethereal Synthesis” in all it’s various forms. From album to album, the locus changes, falling together or falling apart, but the same ethereal techniques apply in different ways. Sometimes, outspoken and political, other times, quiet and interspective. Enjoy. . .
 
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Channel Surfing:
 
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cheyenne_h on 04/25/2017 at 06:58PM

State Of The Commons: 2017 Annual Report

Screenshot from the Report's website; CC BY, Creative Commons 2017.

The commons is the largest collection of free and open knowledge in the world, and the Free Music Archive is proud to be part of it! To get some idea of how vast this amoeba of media, tools, and knowledge is, you should take a look at a report that was just released: the State of the Commons Report!

The numbers are in, and according to Creative Commons, there are more than 1.2 BILLION works shared with CC licenses floating around the web now. 65% of these works are shared under "Free Culture" licenses, which are CC BY, CC BY-SA, and CC0 (as well as other Public Domain tools). All CC licenses grant anyone who encounters a work certain permissions; "Free Culture" licenses are the most permissive and open, allowing for remixing, use in audiovisual projects, and more. The other licenses, which still allow for various types of use and access that standard copyright does not, make up the remaining 35% of the commons.

All of the licenses (aside from public domain tools) are built with cooperation and citation in mind, so if you use CC material, please follow the licenses and be excellent to each other (by giving attribution, for starters - here's an easy example).

Some notable additions this year are the NY Metropolitan Museum of Art, which added 375,000 works to the public domain using CC0; The Global African Storybook Project, which crowdsources translations of children's stories in languages not often considered by publishers to broaden access and encourage literacy; The British Museum, which released 128 models to Sketchfab; and our very own Freeharmonic Orchestra got a shout-out in the highlights section!

Other sources for CC audio listed in the report include Jamendo and Wikimedia Commons, but there is also a wealth of CC-licensed music in the Internet Archive and lots of free, re-usable sounds over at freesound.org.

Do you have other favorite spots to look for audio in the Commons? Comment below! And don't forget to read, excerpt, share, and tweet the report at http://stateof.creativecommons.org with the hashtag #sotc.

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cheyenne_h on 01/25/2017 at 02:44PM

FMA Q&A: "The Gateway Bug" Soundtracked with FMA's Help

A still from the film's trailer. Find it here.

A few weeks ago we got a message from a couple of producers, Johanna Kelly and Cameron Marshad, who were working on a film. They wanted some help getting in touch with the band Atlantic Thrills, because their song "Bed Bugs" from a WFMU Live performance had caught their attention. They wanted to use it to accompany the ending credits of their upcoming documentary, "The Gateway Bug."

The film is an exploration of 'entomophagy,' or, as you might call it in plain English, eating insects! Many have touted this practice as a way to conserve natual resources and take advantage of a food source that is nutritious, easy to cultivate, and plentiful, especially in parts of the world that have not embraced the practice. The film will debut at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival on February 2, 2017. More info can be found here.

FMA: Tell me about your project, "The Gateway Bug."  

Johanna: Our fully independent documentary exposes America's disconnect with food as pivotal tipping point for climate change and global warming. Following the terrifying paper presented in 2013 by the UN that food production must double by 2050 to feed Earth's exploding population, and their warning that at this rate, that’s impossible - we needed to know how and why. Upon finding that nutrition is direct result of culture and policy, everyday activities like eating, gardening and grocery shopping become revolutionary acts. This film converts viewers into activists, inviting exploration of taste, ethics and taboos to ignite social change through education.

Cameron: "The Gateway Bug" explores the booming edible insect industry now taking hold in Western countries as a direct response to the unsustainable agricultural practices we’ve witnessed over the last several decades. We discovered the topic through our friend studying at UCSB, and for his thesis he was tasked with developing a business that solves an ecological problem. The problem he was most familiar with was the overfishing of our oceans, and he proposed we start using insects as fish feed, rather than wild fish. Johanna and I found this fascinating, especially when we started talking about insects for human consumption.

FMA: Why did you want to make a film about this topic?

Cameron: The earth and its population are facing many crises at the moment, and food is one big part of that puzzle. We can't survive without it. I am an adventurous eater, and when I heard about humans starting to eat insects in the US, the land of the free and home the quarter pounder with cheese, I was immediately entranced. The reason I wanted to make this film was to tell the story about climate change from a different perspective, one that involves food culture breaking social norms.

Johanna: I'm a filmmaker because I'm a film-lover and I watch a lot of documentaries. It's kind of my favourite way to learn these days and I think a lot of people feel the same way. You can spend weeks trying to finish a book on something you want to know more about, or you can just sit down on your couch and be an expert in a couple of hours. These issues and solutions stand to change the world, so what better way to share them than in the easily digestible (HA!) form of a film? I hope our film helps people see how easy it is to help the planet and minimise climate change. Which in turn hopefully also makes them feel damn good about themselves, improving their health through better nutrition is just a happy side effect in my eyes.

FMA: Do you consider the purpose of the film educational, social, culinary, or something else?

Cameron: I believe the purpose of the film is to enable free thought around how our food is made and how we define what is food. It's a mix of educational, social, and culinary commentary; we meet chefs, farmers, celebrities, and Washington leaders, so we show the burgeoning edible insect industry from multiple angles. We also use archival footage throughout, which is meant to invoke a feeling of "Wait, we've been talking about this stuff for years, why hasn't anything changed?" I think it is a call to action, to encourage new ways of thinking about food production and food culture and their environmental consequences.

Johanna: I think it covers a lot of ground: social impact, environmental, culinary exploration of culture, what it means to survive in America, eating an American diet and how that's a vastly different experience depending on where you were born. We go from cricket farms in food deserts across the rust belt and the water crisis in Flint Michigan to high end restaurants on the lower east side in New York City. From tech geeks in Silicon Valley to Aquaponic farms in Santa Barbara and everything in between.

>>READ MORE below for more answers, further reading, and links!


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cheyenne_h on 01/17/2017 at 02:47PM

FMA Q&A: Australian Radio Producer Michael Schubert, Winner of National Features and Documentary Award

Michael with his National Features & Documentary trophy (+ FMA shirt!)

Every once in a while, we get a message about something special happening to tracks from the Free Music Archive. Recently, we heard from Michael Schubert, a radio producer whose work was nominated for Australia's National Features and Documentary Award. His work featured FMA audio prominently, so he wanted us to know about it. We love and deeply appreciate news of cool stuff happening with audio sourced from our little ol' archive. A few weeks later, we heard from him again - he won!

Michael has had a lifelong interest in audio, and is now Broadcast Manager at his local community radio station BayFM Byron Bay, which is also home to multiple award winning shows and documentaries, including his own, In Search Of Silence. He is also involved with the production of SoundMinds, a 15-minute weekly program that features the work of a university researcher in their own voice, and mindwaves, a program that "explores ideas, drawing from philosophy, psychology, sociology, biology and science in general; providing a point of intersection between these disciplines; creating an opportunity to cross over between different "ways of seeing".

You can listen to "In Search of Silence" below:

 

 

We followed up with Michael to find out more about his creative process and how the Free Music Archive factors into his work.

FMA: Can you give a quick overview of "In Search of Silence"?

MS: In Search of Silence is my personal project and my first venture into a longer form documentary. Being on radio and producing a documentary about silence seemed like the perfect match. In Search of Silence is a 30 minute documentary that does include radio silence (a suspenseful 8 seconds), as well as interviews with a conductor, movie sound producer and cognitive science hearing expert. I also got myself locked in an anechoic chamber and was honoured to be proclaimed winner of the National Features and Documentary Award 2016. The award recognises the value of such work and in a not for profit sector such as community radio, it is not an easy journey. It gives me the confidence to move forward on other projects in the future.

FMA: Why did you want to explore the theme of 'silence' for your audio documentary?

MS: In mindwaves earlier seasons I had taken on the concept of silence several times, each time finding new perspectives and new ideas.  And silence is such a juxtaposition to audio production.  On radio we call it "dead air" and avoid it.  To be honest, the fact that you can't really explain what silence is intrigued me, because it is realistically the absence of sound and does not "exist".  There's absolute zero for temperature, absolute zero for speed, but no absolute quiet. And the more you go down the rabbit hole of silence, the more perspectives there are.  When I started talking about the idea, no matter who I talked with, they got excited.  Not just musicians and sound engineers, but artists and accountants.  Everyone had an idea and everyone wanted to know what I might do with it.

FMA:  Did you learn anything new or interesting about silence while you were making the documentary?

MS: I keep coming back to something I know, but it still is a bit weird and freaky. There is no sound in your head. None.  Just electrical and chemical connections that we interpret as sound. There are sound waves in the world, but not in your head. It's a bit weird to contemplate, particularly when you talk to yourself. Who are you listening to?

FMA: What went into making "In Search of Silence"?

MS: I was used to doing a 15 minute piece, but 30 minutes is long, and if it's not interesting, it's really boring. That was my main challenge: getting the pace right. Silence is not in itself exciting, so the story had to be compelling. 

One day I drove 40 miles, flew 500 miles, caught a train to a university, got locked in the anechoic chamber and completed three interviews, flew back home and picked my own daughter up from university. That was huge, particularly when I realised I had not recorded my first session in the anechoic chamber (lesson: don't take new equipment to important gigs) and had to go back later in the same day. I realised later how lucky I was for and the generousity of essentially 'rock stars' in their own fields of research, conducting and film sound recording.

My main mentor was honest, really honest.  The first draft file was, to say the least, a bit underwhelming.  It was as he said, 'more about your script writing skills than the talent' and it had 'not delivered' on what he thought would be an interesting idea.  Good to hear about the script writing skills, but back to editing. With the help of another couple of mentors (sound and tech guys who listened to the entire piece) and armed with 5 pages of notes, I went to work.  And the deadline was real, the documentaries had a time booked to go to air.  Many hours listening to the same piece of audio, tweaking here and there.  And a very understanding family (including my wife as the 'voice of silence') who looked at my back as I edited for what seemed like  forever to them.  They are used to me getting SoundMinds done within a day. At one level it is all about the workflow and file management, boring I know. But if you just get a system that works for you, so you can find what you need (even if it is all in one huge folder, with backups), you are way ahead.  And don't try new things 'on the fly', just use what you know and ask lots of questions.  People are remarkably helpful.

>>Read more below, including Michael's Top Ten tips for audio documentaries!


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Chill and ambiant songs from Monplaisir & cie's projects under Creative Commons 0 and Public Domain
Komiku - "Un désert" (04:05)
Komiku - "Un désert" (04:05)
UPLOADED:05/10/2017
TRACKS:22
LISTENS:87
STARRED:0
DOWNLOADS:378
EMBED THIS MIX:
 
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